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A 1,500-YEAR-OLD PRE-VIKING ARROW AND A VIKING ARROW ARE FOUND IN NORWAY

Norwegian explorers have found two arrows, after it was left exposed by melting ice.


A 1,500-year-old pre-Viking arrow and a Viking arrow are found in Norway
It dates back to around the 6th century AD - which pre-dates the Viking Age by a couple of hundred Years. — Image Credit: Espen Finstad/Secrets of the Ice
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The 'wonderful' arrow was found in a melted ice patch in Norway's Jotunheimen Mountains in Innlandet County, on August 17.


It has a shaft made of pine and an intact iron arrowhead, although the fletching – the fin-shaped arrangement of feathers at the end – no longer remains.


The explorers said it is generally in an 'awesome' state of preservation, because the ice essentially acted as a 'prehistoric deep freezer'.


Climate change and the resulting melting ice are turning Norway's ice patches into 'treasure glaciers', exposing many objects from the distant past.


The arrow dates back to around the 6th century AD – which pre-dates the Viking Age by a couple of hundred years.


Researchers also found a second arrow in the same location that's not as old – likely from the 9th century AD – although it is slightly less well preserved.


Both were found at the Jotunheimen Mountains by experts from the Secrets of the Ice, part of the Glacier Archaeology Program at Innlandet County Council's Department of Cultural Heritage.


The first arrow was found last Wednesday, during a systematic survey of newly exposed ground near a retreating ice patch (a non-moving glacier), .

- Lars Pilø, a cofounder of Secrets of the Ice, told MailOnline.


The arrow can be dated by the shape of the arrowhead, as this type of arrowhead is known from well-dated archaeological contexts in the lowlands.

The same goes for the arrowshaft, where the type is known from finds in bogs in Denmark.

It can be quite confusing so see how well preserved the artefacts from the ice are, as they do not look old. The ice acts as a prehistoric deep freezer. 'In a way the objects don’t age, and they normally do not need much conservation, mostly a light clean'.

The first arrow was lying between scree – an accumulation of loose stones or rocky debris lying at the base of a cliff.


The first arrow was likely exposed a few times after it was lost in the snow, as the fletching is gone and the sinew and tar - used for fastening the arrowhead to the shaft - is not perfectly preserved. — Image Credit: Espen Finstad/Secrets of the Ice
The first arrow was likely exposed a few times after it was lost in the snow, as the fletching is gone and the sinew and tar - used for fastening the arrowhead to the shaft - is not perfectly preserved. — Image Credit: Espen Finstad/Secrets of the Ice

It was found near the lower edge of the ice but was likely lost in the snow further up the slope 1,500 years ago.


When snow later melted, the arrow was transported downslope by meltwater, and ended up on the ground where it was found last week, Secrets of the Ice explained in a Twitter thread.


It was likely exposed a few times after it was lost in the snow, as the fletching is gone and the sinew and tar – used for fastening the arrowhead to the shaft – is not perfectly preserved. But overall the preservation of the arrow is 'pretty awesome'.


There are also remains of the tar that would have glued the fletching to the arrow's shaft and the 'thickened' nock – the notch in the feathered end for engaging the bowstring.


Dr Pilø said the site where this arrow was found is a reindeer hunting site, at more than 6,500 feet elevation (2,000 metres).


Reindeer would go onto the ice and snow on hot days to avoid botflies, which can lay their eggs in the flesh of mammals.


The ancient hunters knew this and hunted them on the snow. 'When the hunters missed their target, the arrow could disappear into the snow and be lost'.

- Pilø told MailOnline.


Researchers also found a second arrow in the same location that's not as old - likely from the 9th century AD - although it is slightly less well preserved (pictured). — Image Credit: Espen Finstad/Secrets of the Ice
Researchers also found a second arrow in the same location that's not as old - likely from the 9th century AD - although it is slightly less well preserved (pictured). — Image Credit: Espen Finstad/Secrets of the Ice

Meanwhile, the second arrow is slightly less well preserved, with the arrowhead barely attached to the shaft, although there is a little piece of the fletching still attached.


The second arrow has birch bark looped around it, close to the arrowhead, which would originally have helped secure the arrow to the shaft – something only the Vikings did. It is less well preserved than the first arrow likely because it was exposed for a longer period. It was found on the same site in the Jotunheimen Mountains, between the rocks in the scree.


Other objects have been found at Jotunheimen Mountains this year, Dr Pilø said, including animal bone and antler, and remains of scaring sticks – thin sticks with a movable object attached to the top, thought to be used for reindeer hunting.


SOURCE: Daily Mail

Chadwick, Jonathan. “1,500-year-old pre-Viking arrow is found in an 'awesome' state of preservation — as rapidly melting ice reveals contents of Norway's 'treasure glaciers'”. Daily Mail. London. 22 aug. 2022. 22 aug. 2022. <https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-11133589/1-500-year-old-pre-Viking-arrow-awesome-state-preservation.html>.


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